A Fertility Nutritionist Top 5 Foods to Eat During Pregnancy

During pregnancy, the list of foods to eat and not to eat during pregnancy can vary widely, depending on who you ask. It can be so confusing for those who want to focus on high levels of nutrition while expecting.

Today we have a guest post written by Tracy Lockwood Beckerman. She is the nutrition advisor for FertileGirl, a registered dietitian and fertility specialist at Tracy Lockwood Beckerman Nutrition and is based in New York City.

During pregnancy, the list of foods to eat and not to eat during pregnancy can vary widely, depending on who you ask. It can be so confusing for those who want to focus on high levels of nutrition while expecting.

Today we have a guest post written by Tracy Lockwood Beckerman. She is the nutrition advisor for FertileGirl, a registered dietitian and fertility specialist at Tracy Lockwood Beckerman Nutrition and is based in New York City.

During pregnancy, the list of foods to eat and not to eat during pregnancy can vary widely, depending on who you ask. It can be so confusing for those who want to focus on high levels of nutrition while expecting.

Today we have a guest post written by Tracy Lockwood Beckerman. She is the nutrition advisor for FertileGirl, a registered dietitian and fertility specialist at Tracy Lockwood Beckerman Nutrition and is based in New York City.

TRACY'S TOP 5 FOODS FOR PREGNANCY

1- Whole grain carbohydrates

It's time to up the carb ladies for a surge in energy!  The carbohydrate requirements increase from about 130-150g carbohydrates per day in non-pregnant women to about 175-185g/day in pregnancy. Remember to focus on whole grain carbohydrates for a healthy dose of fiber (I'm looking at you buckwheat, farro, quinoa, kamut, sorghum) instead of highly processed and refined carbohydrates. 

 

2- Legumes (beans, peas, lentils)

Iron is integral for both fetal/placental development and to also increase mom's red blood cell count. The two dietary forms of iron include heme and non-heme. Although the most bioavailable form is heme iron (found mostly in meat, poultry and fish), you can get non-heme iron in plant foods, fortified grains and legumes. To increase the absorption of non-heme iron, pair it with foods rich in vitamin C (such as tomato, oranges, broccoli, peppers). 

 

3- Hard cheese (parmesan, grueye, gouda, jarlsberg)

You heard it right! It's time to grab some hard cheese next time you are in the grocery store. Why? Well, hard cheeses are overflowing with vitamin D and calcium (in fact 1oz of grueye cheese contains about 30% of the DV of calcium per day in a pregnant woman). Plus, it's even more important to eat foods rich in vitamin D and calcium in the 3rd trimester due to the high demands of the fetal skeleton development. 

 

4- Egg yolks

Did you get your choline today? Unfortunately, choline doesn't get much attention but it is an essential nutrient to the development of the central nervous. Most women consume about 50% less than the recommended amount. Egg yolks are rich source of choline and just 1 yolk gets you towards 20% of the DV of choline per day, 450mg respectively. Bonus: egg yolks contain especially crucial vitamins during pregnancy such as vitamins A, D, E, K, essential fatty acids and high amounts of iron, calcium and vitamin B12. That's no yolk!

 

5- Hazelnuts

Not only do hazelnuts contain beneficial dietary fiber, a healthy boost of protein but it's rich in magnesium and folate. Hazelnuts are the #1 among treenut in folate content, clocking in around 8% of your DV per serving. Adequate folate is essential during pregnancy to decrease risk of neural tube birth defects and also may help to reduce cardiovascular disease risk. Hazelnuts are especially high in copper, which is essential for iron absorption, talk about killing two birds with 1 stone (or hazelnut!)      


ABOUT TRACY


Tracy Lockwood Bio 2.jpg

Tracy Lockwood Beckerman, MS, RD, CDN nutrition advisor for FertileGirl, registered dietitian and fertility specialist at Tracy Lockwood Beckerman Nutrition in New York City.

Tracy completed her dietetic internship and received her Master’s Degree in Clinical Nutrition from New York University.  At her private practice in midtown Manhattan, she specializes in weight management, women's health, pre-conception nutrition, gestational diabetes/PCOS, thyroid management, gastrointestinal disorders, eating disorders and pediatrics.

Jen Mayer